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HomeNewsGravenhurst High School students creating ceramic poppies for third year

Gravenhurst High School students creating ceramic poppies for third year

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For the third year running, students at Gravenhurst High School (GHS) are creating ceramic poppies ahead of Remembrance Day.

The project is the brainchild of Aimée Bulloch-Moore, who teaches visual arts and ceramics at GHS. “Gravenhurst High School has always been a really community-based school,” she tells the MyMuskokaNow.com newsroom. 

It’s primarily Bulloch-Moore’s students that are involved in the creation of the poppies, but she says she tries to get the entire school involved in the process. “It’s like a little machine,” she says, adding that she tries to give all her students tasks. Other teachers help out by signing their students up to take part for one period a day. “We always have a really good response,” she says. Bulloch-Moore goes on to say even alumni get involved in the creation of the poppies.

“We try to stay true to the authenticity of the legion poppies,” she says.

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Last year, over $4,000 was raised with every dollar going to support the Bracebridge, Huntsville, Gravenhurst, and Bala Legions. The first year of the initiative saw just over $1,200 raised. “I’m very confident that we’re going to go over that amount this year,” Bulloch-Moore says of this year’s fundraising effort.

The poppies are available for $5 at:

The Bracebridge, Huntsville, Gravenhurst and Bala Legions. Also, at The Annex and Lilibird in Bracebridge; Canvas Brewing Company, Family Place Restaurant and Pub on the Docks in Huntsville; and Arts at the Albion in Gravenhurst. 

Bulloch-Moore says they’ve already sold close to 1,000 poppies with another 400 being prepared. 

What Bulloch-Moore likes so much about the poppies is the imperfections some of them have. She points out that some might have to be painted a couple of times if a spot is missed, others might be chipped or maybe the black paint bleeds into the red. “There’s a cool story behind them,” she says proudly. “Each poppy goes through such a cycle.”

Just as important as creating the poppies is learning the history behind them. Bulloch-Moore explains that as they go along, she teaches the participating students about what the poppy represents, the important role Legions play in the community, and about the First World War. 

If you’re looking for a more traditional poppy, the national poppy campaign started on Friday. They will be sold at participating locations until November 11th. “Our most recent reported campaign year was the 2018 poppy campaign in which 19 million poppies were distributed, and more than $15 million was disbursed between October 2018 and October 2019 to support veterans and their families,” a note on the Legion’s website reads.

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